Wednesday, February 22, 2006

Why did the Danish newspaper publish the Muhammad cartoons?

In an oped published in the Washington Post, Flemming Rose, editor of the newspaper that first published the controversial Muhammad cartoons, explained his decision. Here are some excerpts:

"I commissioned the cartoons in response to several incidents of self-censorship in Europe caused by widening fears and feelings of intimidation in dealing with issues related to Islam. And I still believe that this is a topic that we Europeans must confront, challenging moderate Muslims to speak out…

We have a tradition of satire when dealing with the royal family and other public figures, and that was reflected in the cartoons. The cartoonists treated Islam the same way they treat Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism and other religions. And by treating Muslims in Denmark as equals they made a point: We are integrating you into the Danish tradition of satire because you are part of our society, not strangers. The cartoons are including, rather than excluding, Muslims…

Has Jyllands-Posten insulted and disrespected Islam? It certainly didn't intend to. But what does respect mean? When I visit a mosque, I show my respect by taking off my shoes. I follow the customs, just as I do in a church, synagogue or other holy place. But if a believer demands that I, as a nonbeliever, observe his taboos in the public domain, he is not asking for my respect, but for my submission. And that is incompatible with a secular democracy….

Nowhere do so many religions coexist peacefully as in a democracy where freedom of expression is a fundamental right. In Saudi Arabia, you can get arrested for wearing a cross or having a Bible in your suitcase, while Muslims in secular Denmark can have their own mosques, cemeteries, schools, TV and radio stations….

The lesson from the Cold War is: If you give in to totalitarian impulses once, new demands follow. The West prevailed in the Cold War because we stood by our fundamental values and did not appease totalitarian tyrants."

1 Comments:

At Fri Feb 24, 06:53:00 AM PST, Anonymous Evelyne said...

Personally, I think there is a significant difference between satiring royal familes or famous people and doing the same with religions. I do not really like those cartoons, they remind me previous intolerant caricatures in the History... In my opinion, the real debate and questions are more: "do you think that the regular muslim palestinian read or had access to a local danish comic journal?" and "regarding the fact that the cartoons were published in sept-oct 2005, why do all the demonstrations started 4 months later?"...

 

Post a Comment

<< Home